Dynamic Movement Assessment: Move to Improve (Part 1) Impact of Movement on Injuries/Performance & the DMA

Availability: In stock

$40.00

1 hour

Quick Overview

Presented by: Trent Nessler

This class will go over the terminology used when referring to human movement, teach the impact of movement on biomechanical loading of tissues and pain/inhibition, and the physiology behind the Dynamic Movement Assessment (DMA).

Description

This class will go over the terminology used when referring to human movement, teach the impact of movement on biomechanical loading of tissues and pain/inhibition, and the physiology behind the Dynamic Movement Assessment (DMA).

Details

Run Time: 1 hour

Attendee: Physical Therapists, PTA's, Students, Athletic Trainers

Required Equipment: Personal Computer, Tablet, or Smartphone with access to Broadband Internet (<1.4 mbps)

Examination: 8-question test. Passing grade of 70% or higher required for certificate

Course Evaluation: Yes

Certificate of Completion: Yes

Workbook/Handout: No

Course Approvals/Certifications: 

  • BOC Approval: Northeast Seminars is recognized by the Board of Certification, Inc. to offer continuing education for Certified Athletic Trainers. This program has been approved for (1) hours of Category A continuing education. BOC Approved Provider Home Study Course: #P498

Outline

Module I

DMA (Part 1): Section One

DMA (Part 1): Section Two

DMA (Part 1): Section Three

Final Test

Certificate of Completion

Course Evaluation

Learning Goals

Upon completion of this class, you should be able to:

  • Define terminology used when referring to human movement
  • Describe the impact of movement on length tension curve, biomechanical loading of tissues, and pain/inhibition
  • Understand segmental analysis of pathokinematics on links in kinetic chain, and the physiology behind the Dynamic Movement Assessment

Behavioral Objectives

Upon completion of this class, you should be able to:

1. Accurately identify the one, primary joint/origin of pathomechanics in the lower extremity of an athlete, after performing a squat test or a step up test.

2. Analyze 4 potential conditions seen in the lumbar spine of an athlete who demonstrates a lateral shift, a Trendelenburg sign, corkscrew or SB during a DMA.

3. Document your clinical observations using three, new, descriptive terms in your assessment following a DMA in an athlete. 

4. When working with an athlete in an exercise program for the hip and knees, demonstrate the 3 components included in the proper test position of the side plank.

5. Integrate the 7 components of the DMA when assessing an athlete.

6. Evaluate 3 pathomechanics you might observe, in an athlete during exercise drills, when performing a single leg squat test.

Details

This class will go over the terminology used when referring to human movement, teach the impact of movement on biomechanical loading of tissues and pain/inhibition, and the physiology behind the Dynamic Movement Assessment (DMA).

Additional Information

Instructor(s) Trent Nessler
Platform Online